Academic skills

It takes a combination of skills — organization, time management, prioritization, concentration and motivation — to achieve academic success.

Academic skills

Spend time planning and organizing. Using time to think and plan is time well-spent. In fact, if you fail to take time for planning, you are, in effect, planning to fail.

Academic skills

Organize in a way that makes sense to you. If you need color and pictures, use a lot on your calendar or planning book. Some people need to have papers filed away; others get their creative energy from their piles. So forget the "shoulds" and organize your way.

Goals give your life, and the way you spend your time, direction. Set goals which are specific, measurable, realistic and achievable. Your optimum goals are those which cause you to "stretch" but not "break" as you strive for achievement. Goals can give creative people a much-needed sense of direction.

Use the Rule originally stated by the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto who noted that 80 percent of the reward comes from 20 percent of the effort. The trick to prioritizing is to isolate and identify that valuable 20 percent.

Once identified, prioritize time to concentrate your effort on those items with the greatest reward. Prioritize by color, number or letter — whichever method makes the most sense to you. Flagging items with a deadline is another idea for helping you stick to your priorities.

Use a to-do list. Some people thrive on using a daily To Do list which they construct either the last thing the previous day or first thing in the morning. Such people may combine a To Do list with a calendar or schedule. Others prefer a "running" To Do list which is continuously being updated.

Or, you may prefer a combination of the two previously described To Do lists. Whatever method works is best for you. Don't be afraid to try a new system — you just might find one that works even better than your present one! Allow time for interruptions and distractions. Time management experts often suggest planning for just 50 percent or less of one's time.

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With only 50 percent of your time planned, you will have the flexibility to handle interruptions and the unplanned "emergency. Save or make larger blocks of time for your priorities.

When interrupted, ask Alan Lakein's crucial question, "What is the most important thing I can be doing with my time right now? Consider your biological prime time. That's the time of day when you are at your best. Are you a "morning person," a "night owl," or a late afternoon "whiz?

Do the right thing right. Noted management expert, Peter Drucker, says "doing the right thing is more important than doing things right. Focus first on effectiveness identifying what is the right thing to dothen concentrate on efficiency doing it right.

Urgent tasks have short-term consequences while important tasks are those with long-term, goal-related implications. Work towards reducing the urgent things you must do so you'll have time for your important priorities. Flagging or highlighting items on your To Do list or attaching a deadline to each item may help keep important items from becoming urgent emergencies.

Practice the art of intelligent neglect. Eliminate from your life trivial tasks or those tasks which do not have long-term consequences for you. Can you delegate or eliminate any of your To Do list?

Work on those tasks which you alone can do. Avoid being a perfectionist. In the Malaysian culture, only the gods are considered capable of producing anything perfect. Whenever something is made, a flaw is left on purpose so the gods will not be offended.

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Yes, some things need to be closer to perfect than others, but perfectionism, paying unnecessary attention to detail, can be a form of procrastination.About Us The Academic Skills Center (ASC) offers a variety of academic enrichment programs consisting of Supplemental Workshops and Study Session in addition to .

Examples of academic skills include time management, reading proficiency, oral communication, written communication, critical thinking, research abilities, analytical thinking and problem solving.

In addition, students also need organizational and interpersonal skills to excel in an academic setting. Academic Skills To be successful in graduate school, you need to develop your academic skills. Presentation skills, writing skills, responsible conduct of research—these and more are required of a competent and confident professional.

The Academic Skills Center (ASC) at Heritage University is committed to academic excellence and provides services that are accessible for all students. The ASC provides tutoring services for all major subjects including mathematics, science, writing, history, social science, and critical thinking.

Academic Skills Tutors are also available by appointment to meet with you. You can make an academic skills tutoring appointment using a system called TutorTrac. Click here for a brief guide on scheduling an appointment through TutorTrac. Oct 18,  · Academic skills are a collection of study habits, learning strategies, and time management tools that help students learn and absorb school lessons.

For most students, learning is about much more than access to information.

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