Institutional violence

In it was reported that one in five inmates, or twenty percent of inmates, at fourteen state prisons had been physically assaulted by another inmate. The attacks that are implemented onto anyone but the self are either instrumental or expressive.

Institutional violence

A place where the woman can belong, a place which she can call hers. When women start touching each other in sexual ways, the staff increases their medication. In fact, forced medication especially the use of tranquilizers is included in the list of practices considered forms of violence.

This is often done not because of medical reasons but because of social prejudices against mentally challenged women and a lack of understanding of sexuality. Homophobia may also be part of the equation. Says Ratnaboli Ray, a mental health worker: It is also not true that because they are mentally ill, they are sex crazy — it is also another myth.

As literate adults, we also touch our own bodies. So for example, when we talk we may keep our hands inside our sweaters or pockets. It is imperative to understand what sexuality is, and how it is a very normal day-to-day thing.

We make an issue out of it because of our own value system. The knowledge of psychiatry is very limiting; it is only about symptoms and alleviations of symptoms. To believe that a person who has been incarcerated for ten years will lead a life of celibacy is also an extreme thing to expect.

Even if they are homosexual, there is nothing wrong in it. The homophobia present in institutions and in our state leads to the thinking that a woman exploring another woman is mad or diseased. These are two separate issues, but in either case, hysterectomy is not the solution.

Some mentally-challenged women do find it hard to manage their menstrual period, specially if they are not taught how to do so. It is the responsibility of the institution to patiently do this and provide the hand-holding and assistance required.

Institutional Violence | Colours of Resistance Archive

The removal of the uterus and ovaries from the body of a woman who does not have the capacity to make an informed decision about this is a serious violation, and can become extremely controversial. Sometimes institutions say that family members themselves request such drastic steps.

Families and loved ones of mentally ill patients living in institutions need to similarly examine their motivations. While a hysterectomy will make a woman incapable of becoming pregnant and protect her from an unwanted pregnancy in case of abuseit will also hide sexual abuse within the institution from coming to the fore.

Sadly, pregnancy may sometimes be the only evidence of sexual abuse in institutional settings. Institutions have sometimes removed the uterus of patients to hide instances of abuse. A hysterectomy can remove the evidence of abuse but does not protect the woman from the abuser or the abuse.

When considering such drastic action, keep the humanity of the woman at the centre: The rights bodily integrity, personal autonomy, and sexual and reproductive health of these women cannot be sacrificed at the altar of convenience. When the women living in our institutions get pregnant, we either abort the foetus or give the child up for adoption.Take this quiz to gauge your understanding of institutional violence, which is also known as structural violence.

You can print the quiz and use it. Violence and Nonviolence: Pathways to Understanding is the first book to provide an integrative, systematic approach to the study of violence and nonviolence.

For me, the point of the term “structural violence” is to act as an umbrella to encapsulate many different forms of various social and institutional failings that have real, if not always immediately appreciable consequences in peoples’ lives.

Institutional violence

As Dom Helder puts it, institutional violence breeds counter-violence, violence #2 -- race or food riots, prison revolts, taking hostages, terrorism, violent revolutions, and some of the crime we experience in our communities. Nov 03,  · Your review of Tina Rosenberg's "Children of Cain" (Sept.

8) quotes admiringly her conclusions that Latin American violence is "planned" and "deliberate" and violence in the United States is not. For me, the point of the term “structural violence” is to act as an umbrella to encapsulate many different forms of various social and institutional failings that have real, if not always immediately appreciable consequences in peoples’ lives.

Structural violence - Wikipedia